Well, hello!

Third culture kid (TCK3CK) is a term coined in the early 1950s by American sociologist and anthropologist Ruth Hill Useem “to refer to the children who accompany their parents into another society”. Other terms, such as trans-culture kid or Global Nomad are also used by some. More recently, American sociologist David C. Pollock developed the following description for third culture kids:

“A Third Culture Kid (TCK) is a person who has spent a significant part of his or her developmental years outside the parents’ culture. The TCK frequently builds relationships to all of the cultures, while not having full ownership in any. Although elements from each culture may be assimilated into the TCK’s life experience, the sense of belonging is in relationship to others of similar background.” (Wikipedia)

While I grew up in Germany and didn’t start living, studying and eventually working abroad until I had finished high school, my friend Maria assured me that I at least fall under the category of Honorary 3CK. I grew up in the Lower Franconia region of Bavaria; in a tiny village of 1,200 souls near Würzburg. Previous stops included Rome (Italy), Bad Nauheim (Germany), Córdoba (Argentina), Hamburg (Germany), Frankfurt am Main (Germany), Philadelphia (USA) and New York (USA). After an exciting and exhilarating 2.5 years in New York City, I’ve decided to return to my come country and move to Munich. Minga, as locals call Munich, has been home since November 2013.

Preiß (plural: Preißn) is a Bavarian expression for people outside of Bavaria. Historically, Preiß was used in Southern Germany for Preussen (people from the Kingdom of Prussia). During the German Empire, the term became a synonym for inhabitants who lived north of the Germersheimer line, which linguistically separated Upper German (spoken in the South) from Central and Low German. Preiß became an insult after Prussia defeated the Austrian troops – Bavaria’s alley – in the Austro-Prussian War. Today, the term is mainly used in the region of Altbayern, which consists of the southern/eastern regions of Bavaria. Altbayerns even go as far as calling everybody a Preiß who does not come from Altbayern, including Swabians, my home region Franconia and pretty much everybody else in the world. The term is used very much tongue in cheek, almost as an endearing insult. Franconia, known for its Lebkuchen (German gingerbread) tradition, even gets its own type of Preißn: Lebkuachapreißn. As a Franconian in Minga, I found the title fitting for a blog.

Besides traveling and having a hard time settling down, I’m also a gluton, especially for all things dessert. A passionate cook and baker, I have decided it was time to find a home to document my adventures. I very recently have also picked up another hobby: photography. While I am certainly no expert at any of these, I invite you to stop by every once in a while, share tips and feedback or simply say hello!

Another topic you might find me touch upon occasionally is working out and being active. At the end of the day, it’s calories in vs. calories out. But don’t worry, whenever I’ll share recipes, I won’t include for how long and hard you need to run to burn them of. These days, I mostly run (half & full marathons) and do CrossFit.

If you want to follow my eating-out adventures, I encourage you to follow me on Foodspotting.

Again, thanks very much for stopping by and well, hello!

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